Cancer Screening

Early detection is key.

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Across all types of cancer, early detection is the key to increasing positive outcomes. Most insurance plans allow for common cancer screenings based on your age, family history, and other factors to help you find cancer as soon as possible.

Aside from preventive care, like avoiding tobacco, maintaining a healthy diet, and getting regular exercise, ensuring that you are being screened for cancer is the best way to ensure you are well. Screenings differ based on type of cancer but are generally best done before or in the absence of symptoms to ensure there are no threats going unnoticed.

Schedule an appointment with a healthcare provider to talk about cancer screenings that are right for you.

Cancer Screening Guidelines By Age

Based on your personal or family history, discuss the following screenings with your provider:

Age 21-39:

Breast Cancer Screening – Beginning at age 21, women should begin screening for breast cancer if you are at higher than average risk.

Cervical Cancer Screening – Starting at age 25, all women should be screened for cervical cancer every 3-5 years, based on test type. Talk to your provider about which is best for you.

Colon Cancer Screening – Beginning at age 21, anyone who is at higher than average risk for colon cancer should begin screening for colon cancer. A variety of tests are available. Talk with your provider about which is best for you.

Age 40-49:

Breast Cancer Screening – Women ages 40 to 44 may choose to begin mammograms. Starting at age 45, all women should get mammograms every year.

Cervical Cancer Screening All women age 40-49 should be screened for cervical cancer every 3-5 years, based on test type. Talk to your provider about which is best for you.

Colon Cancer Screening – Ages 40-44 should be screened for colon cancer if you are at higher than average risk. Everyone should begin colon cancer screening at age 45. A variety of tests are available. Talk with your provider about which is best for you.

Prostate Cancer Screening – Men at age 40 with more than one relative who had prostate cancer before age 65 should begin prostate cancer screening. At age 45, all men should discuss prostate cancer screening and risk with their provider to determine when testing should begin.

Age 50-64:

Breast Cancer ScreeningAll women ages 50-64 should get a mammogram every year.

Cervical Cancer Screening – Every 3-5 years, based on test type. Talk to your provider about which is best for you.

Colon Cancer Screening Everyone should begin colon cancer screening at age 45. A variety of tests are available. Talk with your provider about which is best for you.

Lung Cancer ScreeningAnyone ages 55 or older should talk to a healthcare provider about your smoking history and whether you should get yearly low-dose CT scans to screen for early lung cancer.

Prostate Cancer ScreeningAll men ages 50+ should discuss prostate cancer screening and risk with their provider to determine when testing is appropriate.

Age 65+

Breast Cancer ScreeningAll women ages 65+ should get a mammogram every two years.

Cervical Cancer Screening – No testing is needed if you’ve had regular cervical cancer testing with normal results during the previous 10 years.

Lung Cancer ScreeningAnyone ages 65 or older should talk to a healthcare provider about your smoking history and whether you should get yearly low-dose CT scans to screen for early lung cancer.

Prostate Cancer ScreeningMen ages 65+ who can expect to live at least 10 more years should discuss prostate cancer screening and risk with their provider to determine what testing is appropriate.

Regardless of your age, history, and risk factors, discussing cancer screening with your Primary Care Provider is important. Make sure you’re visiting your provider at least once per year, and discussing cancer screenings and other preventive care while you’re there.

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